Skip to content
    Navigate forward to access suggested results

    New Orleans, LA

    When deciding whether to become an Airbnb host, it's important for you to understand the laws in your city. As a platform and marketplace we do not provide legal advice, but we want to provide some useful links that may help you better understand laws and regulations in New Orleans. This list is not exhaustive, but it should give you a good start in understanding your local laws. If you have questions, contact the Short Term Rental Administration or other city agencies directly, or consult a local lawyer or tax professional.

    Short-term rental regulations

    Anyone who hosts short-term stays (less than 30 consecutive nights at a time) is required to obtain an owner and operator short-term rental license and display their license numbers on their listing page.

    As of December 1, 2019, the regulations for short- term rentals (STR) in New Orleans have changed. The new regulations create an operator license requirement and new owner license categories. Hosts must post both their owner and operator license number on their listing to comply. Additionally, the following types of listings will no longer be eligible to register with the city, and will therefore no longer be permitted.

    • Secondary residence listings (like a vacation home or second home) in residential zones
    • Listings in the Garden District

    Registration requirements effective December 1, 2019

    First, find out which license type your listing is eligible for using the guide below. Then, you can register on the city’s website.

    I rent my primary residence: If your listing is in a residential zone, you’re the property owner, and you have a valid homestead exemption, you may be eligible for an RSTR license. There are 3 different types of RSTR permits: RSTR-Partial, RSTR-Small, RSTR-Large. The type you’re eligible for depends on how many units and how many rooms you want to rent out.

    I rent my secondary residence (a vacation rental or second home): If your listing is not in a residential zone, you’re eligible for a CSTR license.

    I'm a tenant or renter: If you get written permission from the property owner or your landlord and your listing is not in a residential zone, you’re eligible for a CSTR license.

    My listing is in the French Quarter: If your listing is on Bourbon Street, you’re eligible for a CSTR license.

    I want to list a STR in the Garden District: From December 1, 2019, STR listings are banned in the Garden District.

    My listing is in a commercial or mixed use zone: You’re eligible for a CSTR license.

    I don’t have a homestead exemption: A homestead exemption is legal proof that you own your primary residence. The city should have your exemption on file for your property address. If the city has no record of your homestead, you’re only eligible for a CSTR license.

    I want to list multiple dwelling units (ex: multiple apartments in the same apartment building): If your listing is in a residential zone, you’re eligible for the RSTR-Large license. If your listing is in a commercial zone, you’re eligible for the CSTR license.

    I host a licensed hotel, motel, or bed and breakfast: If you host a licensed hotel, motel, or bed and breakfast, you don’t need to add your license numbers to your listing, but you do need to claim an exemption. You can claim an exemption by clicking Register now on your listing, starting registration, choosing the exemption option, and confirming that your listing is a licensed hotel, motel, or b&b.

    License types effective December 1, 2019

    The new short-term rental (STR) owner licenses are divided into two categories, Residential STR (RSTR) and Commercial STR (CSTR). There is only one type of CSTR license but there are three types of RSTR licenses. All three types of RSTR licenses require a Homestead Exemption.

    Residential Partial Unit (RSTR- Partial)

    RSTR-Partial licenses allow property owners to rent up to 5 guest bedrooms to up 10 guests in 1 dwelling unit such as a townhouse, single-family home, apartment, or condo. Hosts must have a valid homestead exemption in their name and live on the property. Only property owners can get this licence. Renters can’t get this license. The fee for this license type is $250. A host is limited to 1 RSTR-Partial license.

    Residential Small (RSTR - Small)

    RSTR-Small licenses allow property owners to rent up to 5 guest bedrooms to up 10 guests in 1 dwelling with no more than 4 dwelling units (i.e. an apartment building with no more than 4 apartments or a single family home with a separate mother-in law unit) Hosts must have a valid homestead exemption in their name and live on the property. Only property owners can get this licence. Renters can’t get this license. The fee for this license type is $500. A host is limited to 1 RSTR-Small license but can have 1 RSTR-Partial license in the same building.

    Residential Large (RSTR-Large)

    RSTR-Large licenses allow property owners to rent up to 6 guest bedrooms to up 12 guests in 3 dwelling units in a dwelling with more than 4 dwelling units. For example, this license would let a host rent out 3 separate apartments in the same apartment building if the building has more than 4 apartments. Hosts must have a valid homestead exemption in their name and live on the property. Only property owners can get this licence. Renters can’t get this license. The fee for this license type is $500. A host can get up to 3 RSTR-Large licences.

    Commercial (CSTR)

    Property owners or renters in non-residential zones can apply for a CSTR license. CSTR licenses allow hosts to rent up to 5 guest bedrooms to up to 10 guests in any building where fewer than 25% of the total dwelling units are currently licensed for STRs. The fee for this license type is $1000. There is no limit to how many CSTR licenses a host can get.

    How to register

    Step 1: Apply for your owner license and operator license

    You can apply on the city’s website. You’ll need to create an account, enter your listing information, choose a license type, and update a photo ID. If you’re a tenant, you’ll also need to upload an affidavit from your landlord saying you have permission to host.

    Step 2: Pay for your license

    Within 2 weeks, the city will process your application and notify you by email. If you’re approved, the city will email you a link to pay for your short-term rental license online.

    Step 3: Add your license number to your Airbnb listing

    As a last step, you’ll need to add both your owner license number and your operator license number to your listing to finalize your registration with the city. Once you add your license numbers, your registration will be complete and you can continue hosting short-term stays.

    General information

    The city provides general information about rules and regulations on its Short terms Rentals page. This includes contact information for the STR Administration. You can also find out about the legislation adopted by the City Council to authorize short term rentals. On May 24, 2018, the New Orleans City Council passed a motion creating a 9-month Interim Zoning District (IZD) prohibiting certain types of short-term rental licenses in particular zoning districts. Get additional information on the IZD appeal process.

    Taxes and fees

    As of January 1, 2017, Airbnb now collects and remits taxes to the City of New Orleans on behalf of its users. Find out more about that process. If you rent on other platforms in addition to Airbnb, you are responsible for collecting and reporting the taxes and fees from any rental arrangement made on those other platforms or through any other means. For more information, visit the Short Term Rental Taxation page.

    Zoning restrictions

    Only specific types of short term rentals are allowed in specific zoning districts. For more information, visit the Short Term Rental Zoning Restrictions page.

    Other rules

    It's also important to understand and abide by other contracts or rules that bind you, such as leases, condo board or co-op rules, HOA rules, or rules established by tenant organizations. Please read your lease agreement and check with your landlord if applicable.

    Our commitment to your community

    We're committed to working with local officials to help them understand how Airbnb benefits our community. Where needed, we'll continue to advocate for changes that will allow regular people to rent out their own homes.